tag: Full Length Shows (5)

Upcoming ‘Shakespeare in Love’ Productions around the US and Canada

 

11/23/17 – 12/17/17 Marin Theatre Company (Mill Valley, CA)
1/10/18 – 3/28/18 Asolo Repertory Theatre (Sarasota, FL)
1/13/18 – 2/10/18 South Coast Repertory (Costa Mesa, CA)
2/3/18 – 3/4/18 Smithtown Center for the Performing Arts (Smithtown, NY)
2/7/18 – 3/18/18 Orlando Shakespeare Theatre (Orlando,FL)
3/20/18 – 3/24/18 Saint John Theatre Company (Saint John, NB)
3/23/18 – 4/22/18 Austin Playhouse (Austin, TX)
4/4/18 – 4/22/18 Charleston Stage Company (Charleston, SC)
4/13/18 – 5/6/18 Omaha Community Playhouse (Omaha, NE)
4/25/18 – 5/20/18 Seattle Shakespeare Company (Seattle, WA)

 
 
 

  11/23/17 – 12/17/17 Marin Theatre Company (Mill Valley, CA) 1/10/18 – 3/28/18 Asolo Repertory Theatre (Sarasota, FL) 1/13/18 – 2/10/18 South Coast Repertory (Costa Mesa, CA) 2/3/18 – 3/4/18 Smithtown Center for the Performing Arts (Smithtown, NY) 2/7/18 – 3/18/18 Orlando Shakespeare Theatre (Orlando,FL) 3/20/18 – 3/24/18 Saint John Theatre Company (Saint John, NB) …

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Upcoming ‘Newsies’ Productions around the US and Canada

 

11/15/17 – 12/24/17  Phoenix Theatre (Phoenix, AZ)

11/24/17 – 12/10/17  Centenary Stage Company (Hackettstown, NJ)

11/28/17 – 12/17/17  Maltz Jupiter (Jupiter, FL)

12/1/17 – 12/16/17  Pioneer Theatre Co (Salt Lake City, UT)

12/6/17 – 12/31/17  Arts Centre of Costal Carolina (Hilton Head, SC)

12/7/17 – 12/23/17  Springer Opera House (Columbus, GA)

1/5/18 – 1/28/18  Village Theatre (Everett, WA)

3/1/18 – 4/15/18  Fireside Theatre (Ft. Atkinson, WI)

3/2/18 – 9/22/18  Chanhassen Dinner Theater (Chanhassen, MI)

3/15/18 – 6/17/18  Toby’s Dinner Theatre (Columbia, MD)

4/16/18 – 6/10/18  The Media Theatre (Media, PA)

  11/15/17 – 12/24/17  Phoenix Theatre (Phoenix, AZ) 11/24/17 – 12/10/17  Centenary Stage Company (Hackettstown, NJ) 11/28/17 – 12/17/17  Maltz Jupiter (Jupiter, FL) 12/1/17 – 12/16/17  Pioneer Theatre Co (Salt Lake City, UT) 12/6/17 – 12/31/17  Arts Centre of Costal Carolina (Hilton Head, SC) 12/7/17 – 12/23/17  Springer Opera House (Columbus, GA) 1/5/18 – 1/28/18  Village …

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The Benefits of Expanding ‘Peter and the Starcatcher’ For A Large Cast

I’m the Theater Director at Marist School in Atlanta, Georgia. We recently produced Peter and the Starcatcher.

It’s a show written to be performed by about a dozen actors.

We did it with 49. On purpose.

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Marist School (Atlanta, GA)

 

First, a little background:

Our school produces about 4 shows per year for grades 7-12, and we have an unofficial “no cut” policy. Our school does not dictate that we do this, but we simply feel that it is the best idea for our community. Our students have a thousand choices when it comes to extracurricular activities, ranging from robotics and debate to sports and academic teams. Therefore, if a student comes to us and wants to be in a show, we work very hard to find a way to make it happen.

This is an easy practice when it comes to musicals; one can always expand ensembles, divvy up solos, etc. The challenges are a bit more pronounced when it comes to plays.

“[Peter and the Starcatcher] is also a celebration of what I refer to as ‘analog theatrical magic’ – no automation, no digital projections, no lasers.”

Since there are not a lot of plays that involve a large number of actors, we had to get really creative in our solution to the problem of how to reconcile our casting philosophy with scripts that don’t call for big companies. One can only do Our Town, Anatomy of Gray, and The Diviners so many times (there are certainly other shows that have large-ish casts, but you get my drift). Additionally, we want our students to have a meaningful experience in the show, and not just serve as “human set dressing” – “Hey, kids!  We’re going to do The Glass Menagerie, and all of you will be portraying the glass figurines in Laura’s collection!”

Peter and the Starcatcher was the perfect piece for us. Though only written for a small company of actors, the structure of the show is such that there are dozens – if not hundreds – of opportunities to contribute to the storytelling in meaningful and important ways. The show is also a celebration of what I refer to as “analog theatrical magic” – no automation, no digital projections, no lasers, etc. Big blue silk sheets represent the ocean. Dozens of lanterns become the starry night sky. A jungle is populated by an army of creatures, creating a rich and diverse soundscape. And don’t forget the sailors, pirates, and mermaids. Lots and LOTS of mermaids.

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Marist School (Atlanta, GA)

 

None of these are revolutionary ideas, but they can be employed with this script in a way that both involves a lot of actors and assists in the storytelling, rather than get in the way of it.  Thankfully, we have the world’s greatest team: our technical director, music director, costume designer, choreographer, and scores of generous parent volunteers all rose to the challenge of doing this show in this way.

One other solution that we found to be helpful concerned the narration that occurs throughout the show. We found that spreading out the narration amongst the ensemble served several purposes. First, it gave lines to students who otherwise would not have a solo speaking moment in the show. Additionally, it prompted our audience to pay very close attention to the narration, as they had to follow their eyes and ears in order to know who was speaking. It also drove our actors to be very present, clear, physical, and, frankly, loud in order to distinguish themselves as that moment’s speaker.

 

“…our cast is a team. We all work together to create something that is larger than ourselves, and each actor/component/element is valuable.”

 

One of the big themes in our work here is that our cast is a team. We all work together to create something that is larger than ourselves, and each actor/component/element is valuable. When the narration is spread out amongst the company, the action grinds to a halt when someone isn’t there to do their part. When someone isn’t there – mentally or physically – to hoist a drape or manage the shadow puppets, the story is interrupted.

Were there hiccups? Absolutely. We used a massive green drape to suggest the jungle in Act II, and one night the preset was incorrect and it got tangled up while rising in the air. It only delayed us for about 45 seconds…but it felt like 45 minutes. The magic of this particular problem was in watching the ensemble quickly diagnose the issue, come up with a solution, and continue with the story – all while keeping it in the world of the play. Another benefit of having a lot of actors in this show was that there were always a lot of hands available to help out in a pinch.

 

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Marist School (Atlanta, GA)

 

At the end of it all, Peter and the Starcatcher is a celebration of magic: the magic of youth, the magic of belief, the magic of friends, and the magic of theater. The Broadway production that I saw was absolutely magical for its doubling, quick character work, and stunning environment.  Our students grabbed a few handfuls of starstuff and worked their own magic with this show.  The waters may have been a little rough at times, but I cannot imagine navigating them without all 49 of them.

 

Eric McNaughton 

Eric McNaughton holds a B.A. in Theater from Wake Forest University, and apprenticed at Actors Theatre of Louisville.   He is the Theater Director at Marist School in Atlanta, GA, where he has worked on over sixty plays and musicals as tech director, co-director, or director.   During the last few summers, he has performed at Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma, in shows ranging from Ragtime to Big Fish to Les Miserables. Last summer, he worked as Assistant Director for Disney’s When You Wish: A Celebration of the Disney Songbook, also at Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma. 

I’m the Theater Director at Marist School in Atlanta, Georgia. We recently produced Peter and the Starcatcher. It’s a show written to be performed by about a dozen actors. We did it with 49. On purpose. Marist School (Atlanta, GA)   First, a little background: Our school produces about 4 shows per year for grades …

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Hellfire to Heaven’s Light: Creating a Dynamic Sound in The Hunchback of Notre Dame

When the Disney animated film The Hunchback of Notre Dame premiered in 1996, its score was hailed by critics as some of the best work by composer Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz. Twenty years later, Menken and Schwartz returned to their score and expanded it for the stage, this time bringing it closer to the tone and themes of the classic novel by Victor Hugo.

The stage musical features a Choir, present onstage throughout the show, very much the way the cathedral looms above the world of the novel.

Even professional artists may find the show musically challenging, but the results are well worth the effort put in to master this score. Due to the amount of music and the level of difficulty (including several songs in foreign languages), music directors may want to budget a few more weeks of rehearsal than usual for a musical. Here are some tips and strategies to maximize whatever time you have and set you up for success:

altArchbishop Stepanic High School (White Plains, NY)

 

1. CHARACTER ASSIGNMENTS IN THE SCORE
Since there are several different ensembles (or combinations of ensembles) throughout the show, the libretto utilizes the following nomenclature to help you along the way.

Congregation: a troupe of storytellers, who serve as narrators; performers from this ensemble will become the principal characters, Gargoyles, Statues, Revelers, Soldiers, etc.

Congregant: solo member of the Congregation

Congregants: a small group from within the Congregation

Choir: a group of performers separate from the Congregation

All: both the Choir and Congregation singing together

 

“The musical features a Choir, present onstage throughout the show, very much the way the cathedral looms above the world of the novel.”

 

2. THE CHOIR
The Choir is an integral part of the show and should be treated more as a character than an extension of the orchestra.

When casting your Choir, consider how this production can act as a bridge between your school’s theater and choral programs, strengthening each while encouraging collaboration between different student groups; or, how it can be an opportunity to partner with and learn about other performing arts organizations in your community.

 

altJesuit High School (Portland, OR)

 

3. VOCAL WARM-UPS
The ranges required for both the Congregation and Choir are about two to two-and-a-half octaves. In order to stay vocally healthy while singing this material, it is vital that performers incorporate a vocal warm-up into their routine. Use passages from the score or simple scale exercises to prepare for the rehearsal ahead. While in rehearsal, encourage singers to “mark” or sing at half-voice when they are learning notes and rhythms. This will help them preserve those high notes for when they’re needed most and alleviate vocal strain.

altJesuit High School (Portland, OR)

4. PERFORMING WITH AN ORCHESTRA
Michael Starobin had the rare opportunity to orchestrate this score for the animated film, the first stage adaptation in Berlin in 1999, and this new stage version. The orchestration for The Hunchback of Notre Dame requires 14 players, plus conductor, as follows:

Violin 1
Violin 2
Viola
Cello
Reed 1
Reed 2
Reed 3
Horn
Trumpet 1
Trumpet 2
Trombone
Keyboard 1
Keyboard 2
Drums/Percussion

Menken and Schwartz have created a dynamic score where your cast  and orchestra can perform in styles as varied as Gregorian chant (“Olim”), Broadway ensemble (“Topsy Turvy”), Wagnerian opera (“Hellfire” and “Kyrie Eleison”) and contemporary pop (“In a Place of Miracles”).

Now you can perform Menken’s melodic music and Schwartz’s nimble lyrics.  Listen to the Original Studio Cast Recording via iTunes or Spotify.

For more information about The Hunchback of Notre Dame visit the show page. 

When the Disney animated film The Hunchback of Notre Dame premiered in 1996, its score was hailed by critics as some of the best work by composer Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz. Twenty years later, Menken and Schwartz returned to their score and expanded it for the stage, this time bringing it closer to the …

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‘Hunchback Of Notre Dame’ Production Handbook Annotated Bibliography

Below is a list of resources to get you and your cast started in exploring the world of The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Consider encouraging your actors and designers to do further research on the topics they are most interested in or that best relate to their characters or roles in the production.
 

Catholicism

“Catechism of the Catholic Church” : A complete list of the catechisms of the Church compiled by the Vatican.

“The Catholic Encyclopedia” : New Advent, the largest Catholic website in the world, offers the “full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action, and doctrine.”

 

Court of Miracles

“Cours des Miracles” : A short description of the 17th Century Court of Miracles.

 

Disability

Everybody Belongs: Changing Negative Attitudes Toward Classmates with Disabilities: Arthur Shaprio’s book, published by Routledge in 2000, explains how familiar childhood characters like Captain Hook and Porky Pig shape attitudes toward disability. He offers practical guidance to schools that are wrestling with how to integrate children with disabilities.

National Center on Disability and Journalism Disability Style Guide:
This style guide will lead you to the appropriate language to use when discussing disability with your cast.

A Social History of Disability in the Middle Ages: Cultural Considerations of Physical Impairment: This book by Irina Metzler, published by Routledge in 2015, discusses what it was like to be disabled in the Middle Ages.

Stumbling Blocks Before the Blind: Medieval Constructions of a Disability: Edward Wheatley’s book, published by University of Michigan Press in 2010, explores French practices and institutions that led to the commodification of human sight and inhumane satire against the blind in French literature.

 

The Hunchback of Notre Dame on Stage & Screen

The Art of The Hunchback of Notre Dame: Written by Stephen Rebello and featuring art from the Disney animated film, this 1996 book traces the history of the movie and shines light on the animation process.

“Bells Are Ringing” : Ellen Lampert-Greaux’s 1999 article from Live Design magazine profiles the technical elements of Der Glöckner von Notre Dame.

Stephen Schwartz Comments on Disney’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame : A collection of questions posted on Stephen Schwartz’s online forum about The Hunchback of Notre Dame, with answers by Schwartz.

 

Notre Dame Cathedral

“The bells, the bells…! Why Notre Dame is ringing the changes” : A succinct history of the bells of Notre Dame from the Independent.

“Facts on the Notre Dame Cathedral in France” : A short history of the cathedral from construction to restoration from USA Today.

“Gravely Gorgeous: Gargoyles, Grotesques & the Nineteenth-Century Imagination” : Part of Cornell University’s architectural photograph collection, this site explores Gothic architecture, including Notre Dame’s gargoyles and chimera.

“New Bells Restore Old Harmony” : An article from Deutsche Welle detailing the replacement of Notre Dame’s bells for its 850th anniversary.

Notre-Dame de Paris : Notre Dame’s official website which includes historical information about the cathedral.

The Victorian Web : An overview, with images, of the architectural work completed during the 1845-1864 restoration of the cathedral.

 

Paris in the Middle Ages

Paris: The Biography of a City: Colin Jones’s illuminating history, published by Penguin Books in 2006, offers a comprehensive and colorful look at the French capital, including its time during the Middle Ages.

Paris in the Middle Ages: Published by University of Pennsylvania Press in 2009, this book by Simone Roux and translated by Jo Ann McNamara chronicles the lives of Parisians as the city grew from a military stronghold in 1214 to a city recovering from the Black Death of the 1390s.

Women and Power in the Middle Ages: Published by University of Georgia Press in 2004, editor Mary C. Erler compiled a collection of essays that explore the power and activism of medieval women.

 

Roma

The Gypsies: Angus Fraser’s 1995 book, published by Wiley Blackwell, provides an in-depth study of the diaspora and history of Roma in Europe until the end of Communism.

Kopachi.com : Romani author Ronald Lee’s website provides articles about Roma by Romani authors, as well as music, publications, and links to useful other websites.

We Are the Romani People: Written by Romani author and scholar Ian Hancock, this book, published by University of Hertfordshire Press in 2002, offers an excellent introduction on the origin, history, diaspora, language, and customs of the Roma.

 

Sanctuary

Sanctuary and Crime in the Middle Ages: Karl Shoemaker’s book, published by Fordham University Press in 2011, explores sanctuary law’s foundations in late antiquity and emergence in the early Middle Ages.

“What Are Sanctuary Cities?” : This 2017 New York Times article maps jurisdictions in the U.S. that act as “sanctuary cities.”

“What It Was Like to Seek Asylum in Medieval England” : This 2015 Slate article by Eric Grundhauser offers a fascinating and concise history of sanctuary law.

 

Stage Combat

Society of American Fight Directors: The Society of American Fight Directors is an internationally recognized organization dedicated to promoting safety and excellence in the craft of stage combat. Contact your SAFD region representative for training opportunities or hire one of their certified teachers to help design your combat sequences.

 

Story Theater

The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby: The Royal Shakespeare Company’s legendary 1980 stage production of Charles Dickens’s classic, released on DVD in 2002, is one of the most famous examples of the story theater form.

Paul Sills’ Story Theater: Four Shows: This volume, published by Applause in 2000, includes the chapters “Designing for Story Theater,” “Music Notes for Story Theater,” and “Theater Games for Story Theater” (created by Sills’s mother, Viola Spolin).

Story Theatre: This 2015 article by Rosalind Flynn on About.com details the history and conventions of the theater form.

Story Theatre: Another famous example of story theater, this play by Paul Sills with music, published by Samuel French, was adapted from famous fables from the Brothers Grimm and Aesop. The 1970 Broadway production featured a cast of eight actors performing a total of 66 speaking roles, ensemble roles, and sound effects while assisting with – and performing as – set pieces.

 

Victor Hugo’s Notre-Dame de Paris

“The Gothic Revival in France, 1830–1845: Victor Hugo’s Notre-Dame de Paris, Popular Imagery, and a National Patrimony Discovered”: An essay by Julie Lawrence Cochran on the impact of the images from Hugo’s novel on French views on architecture, from the 1999 anthology Memory & Oblivion.

“How a Novel Saved Notre Dame and Changed Perceptions of Gothic Architecture” : Architect Richard Buday’s article in ArchDaily describes the relationship between the cathedral and the novel.

The Hunchback of Notre-Dame: Released in 2002, Catherine Liu’s new translation includes sections of the novel traditionally omitted from English translations as well as an introduction by Elizabeth McCracken.

Notre-Dame de Paris: The Cathedral in the Book”: A journal article from the Winter-Spring 1985 issue of Nineteenth-Century French Studies by Illinca M. Zarifopol-Johnston that provides a literary analysis of Hugo’s use of the cathedral in the novel.

Below is a list of resources to get you and your cast started in exploring the world of The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Consider encouraging your actors and designers to do further research on the topics they are most interested in or that best relate to their characters or roles in the production.   Catholicism …

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